I grew up listening to Mahabharata: Rajamouli

By M Bharat Kumar Published on Apr 20, 2017 02:27 PM IST

Everybody is looking forward to 28 April as S S Rajamouli’s grand and glitzy affair, Baahubali: The Conclusion, is all set to hit the screens. A sequel to his earlier hit, the epic drama, will be out in multiple languages in over 6,500 screens.

The two-part epic-fantasy stars Prabhas, Rana Daggubati, Tamannaah, Anushka Shetty, Ramya Krishnan, Sathyaraj and Nasser in lead roles. Music is by Keeravani (Maragathamani).

Speaking to News Today, Rajamouli, says, 'The first part movie ended with the question - 'Why did Kattappa kill Baahubali'? It has sustained interest in the sequel. Everyone wants to know the answer to the question. We are quite upbeat about it.'

The director, who is known for revenge dramas on screen, says, 'All my movies are inspired by Mahabharata and Ramayana because those are the two epics that have been fed to me right from my childhood. I get my emotional connect from those epics.’

EXCERPTS FROM HIS INTERVIEW

What inspired you to do Baahubali?

It all started with my dad’s (Vijayendra Prasad) narration of individual characters of Baahubali. The electrifying feeling jolted me for more than a month, and every character stayed with me. I would cry, laugh and get emotional while thinking about the characters. I wanted the audience to experience what I had felt when my father first told me the story.

Your journey with Prabhas?

I already directed him in Chatrapathi. But Baahubali was different and demanding. It was wonderful of him to dedicate himself fully for years to Baahubali despite being a top hero of the industry. Baahubali was possible because of Prabhas, who, being a top hero of the south, gave almost four years for the film. I don't think we could've done the film without him.

How was it to carry Baahubali on your shoulders for such a long time?

For almost five years, I have been waking up thinking about Baahubali every morning. From 6 am to midnight, anything and everything I do centered on the film. It is basically one story. But to enlighten the audience and help them get an emotional connect with the story, we made it into two parts. Baahubali is such a big thing, and we, being the people who worked on it, are getting all the attention. I don't think I am bigger than the project.

Tell us about the bond that you share with music composer Keeravani.

He is my brother. We share a great bond that runs for 27 years. Baahubali has a special place in our travel. It is sad that he wants to hang his boots after Baahubali. I sincerely request him to work at least in my films in the coming years. Baahubali is unimaginable without his contribution.

Why did Kattappa kill Baahubali?

The first part of the movie ended with the question - 'Why did Kattappa kill Baahubali'? It has sustained interest in the sequel. Everyone wants to know the answer to the question. Baahubali: The Conclusion, has the answer for this. Wait for a few more days to know the reason.

Will there be more sequels to Baahubali?

The actual story of Baahubali ends with this conclusion. But, there are some characters in the series which have some interesting back stories. These stories could be made into novels, comics, television series and animation.

What's special in Baahubali: The Conclusion?

In the first part, we just introduced the characters. We never showed the in-depth drama among them. The second instalment will showcase the emotions and drama on a bigger scale. The second part will have more drama among the characters.

  THE JOURNEY SO FAR

In 2013, Rajamouli began shooting the first part of the epic franchise, Baahubali: The Beginning, which released in theatres in 2015. The two-part epic series was reportedly made at a cost of Rs 400 crore. The shooting for the second part began in 2015-end and is releasing 28 April in over 6,500 screens.

 

 

 

   HIS EARLIER WORKS

Born in Karnataka, Rajamouli established himself as a filmmaker to reckon with in Tollywood. His films are known for its fantasy element and technical finesse. Rajamouli's prominent films include Student No 1, Simhadri, Sye, Chatrapathi, Vikramarkudu, Yama Donga, Maryadha Ramana, Eega and Baahubali.

 

 

GRAND IS THE WORD

 

 

Great pains have been taken to put together the smallest of weapons and bits of jewellery, to the grandest of palaces, battle sequences, war machines and an array of battle horses and elephants for Baahubali - The Conclusion. Says Rajamouli, "The movie is so huge that no person, including myself, can be bigger than the project. I think be it the director or producer or any other professional involved in the film, we are all being carried on a big ship called Baahubali."